Lost focus in micro development.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by easoccer, Apr 25, 2018.

  1. bigwreck

    bigwreck Member

    Messages:
    6
    Ratings:
    +2 / 0
    And absolutely, putting the player in a position to succeed is important. I can only speak from my observations over the years. For a development team, when a player is perceived to be weaker, he usually gets placed on the wing as forward or back. Over the course of a season, the coach starts playing a player more and more at the same position because he is more successful there. Same coach 2 years later, still favors playing that player at the same position 75% of the time. To me, that is human nature to find best fits for each player that allows the team the best opportunity to succeed. But I dont know if that is necessarily good for player development for 8-11 year olds.
     
  2. easoccer

    easoccer Established Member

    Messages:
    854
    Ratings:
    +267 / 2
    Not its not good.

    Players in micro u12 and under (and to some extent older ages) definitely need to play all positions and get equal time.

    Its in the LTPD as set out by BC Soccer. If your club is promoting LTPD and not following it, then something is seriously wrong.

    If the coach is not following it the the TD needs to address it. Turning a blind eye does not help the kids.

    We all want to win, its in our nature to be competitive, but we need to look at the bigger picture and make sure we are benefitting the kids, not just ourselves.
     
  3. TKBC

    TKBC Established Member

    Messages:
    1,230
    Ratings:
    +137 / 7
    If Canadian Premier League teams have their own academies, sign local players....we'll start getting somewhere. Hopefully...
     
  4. Old Girls Coach

    Old Girls Coach Member

    Messages:
    10
    Ratings:
    +9 / 0
    I hope so. Professional teams are the best place for long term development. I have some worries, though, considering how deeply the Whitecaps are integrated with the BC Soccer development pathway.
     
  5. TKBC

    TKBC Established Member

    Messages:
    1,230
    Ratings:
    +137 / 7
    Yes Whitecaps are, but they scout nationwide, their "reserve" team is in California and has 6-7 Canadians only, and how many Canadians play in their first team regularly? 2...? Maybe 3 now with Levis the last few weeks?

    CPL teams will probably have 6-7 in the First XI plus reserves....guesstimate.
     
  6. JDFMike

    JDFMike Member

    Messages:
    12
    Ratings:
    +2 / 0
    sounds like most of you are on the same page which is very nice to see and i just wanted to add my own little rant here mostly in response to the idea that teaching kids soccer with a focus on fun has gotten our nation nowhere. ha! i certainly don't have all the answers and it's more complicated than this but what i do know is that there is no other way. kids want to do good and be good at something and that spark is there in all of them. fun is THE magic ingredient for any endeavor a child has a passion about - sports, scholastics, whatever. kids take to anything first by enjoying it (HEY THIS IS FUN I WANT TO DO MORE OF THIS), developing a big passion for it (THE MORE I DO THIS FUN STUFF THE MORE I'M LOVING THIS!), and naturally acquiring skills and being able to identify their own progress (I'M ACTUALLY GETTING GOOD AT SOMETHING & FEEL GREAT INSIDE ABOUT IT = FUN!!!) which then starts to build a drive inside and an inner motivation...it's like a positive feedback loop. throw in a good coach (by good i mean someone that is able to easily build rapport with kids, and understands the importance of positive encouragement, fun, and building a growth mindset) and even better parents and that's the laymen formula right there.

    now here's an interesting wrinkle..the french and brazilians produce so much talent in part because the kids in these countries are given balls and introduced to the concepts of football at a very early age, it's a heavy duty part of the overall culture but really big in the youth culture, but more than that they play on pitches every day with their friends for hours with no coaches or parents telling them whats right or wrong. they figure it out as they go by being free, creative, competitive and most of all experiencing football with passion and FUN. they also, on the whole, seem to have uncanny game IQ, something i doubt you'd find in most top academy prospects. i don't know what that all means other than we should start fostering a major football culture at the youth level in this country and soon...8yrs isn't far off.
     
  7. Admin

    Admin Administrator

    Messages:
    370
    Ratings:
    +96 / 2
    How do these French and Brazilian kids get away with it? If no coaches or parents are around, who is going to tell them to stop keeping score?
     
  8. easoccer

    easoccer Established Member

    Messages:
    854
    Ratings:
    +267 / 2

    To be fair, even at the youngest ages, practically all kids keep score. Its the standings that aren't displayed publicly.

    Im coaching my 5 yeard old son and every kid knows the score, better than me even, Im not sure why they decided standings shouldn't be kept. Its a good motivator. Maybe its the coaches who shortened the bench too much at such young ages because winning is fun. For ne personally, it never made a difference. I play all the kids even when parents get angry and teach me how to coach. Lol
     
  9. TKBC

    TKBC Established Member

    Messages:
    1,230
    Ratings:
    +137 / 7
    Who tells kids not to keep score? They do, and should.
     

Share This Page